Gwenda Freeman
Associate Lecturer in Aboriginal Health Education

Gwenda is a Yorta Yorta woman and has recently returned to Victoria, she holds a BA, and an MBA, as well as a Diploma of Community Services and she has worked in Rural Health, Aboriginal Health and Aboriginal education for most of her career with organisations and services in Victoria, Queensland and Northern Territory.

 

Gwenda is a member of the DRH Aboriginal Health team, and her role includes teaching, research and supporting local Aboriginal students who are studying health subjects, she also lectures in Aboriginal health, particularly to the rurally based medical students. She is passionate about Aboriginal health, and education, and about improving the wellbeing of Aboriginal people.  She is also a Fellow of the ACHSM and a committee member of the Friends of the Rural Health Alliance.

Leah Lindrea-Morrison
Aboriginal Partnerships and Community Engagement Officer

Leah is a Yorta Yorta woman, who grew up in the Shepparton area.  Leah’s role is to liaise with the local community members and organisations.   Leah has the lead role in organising the annual Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Conference, plus organises the Department of Rural Health’s NAIDOC event she maintains strong cultural relationships with key stake holders in the local area.

 

Leah also sits on the National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Reference group, Breast Cancer Network Australia and is on the Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre’s Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Reference Group.

Trudie Newman
Research Assistant - Aboriginal Health

Trudie is a Baakandji woman and has lived and worked in the Goulburn Murray region for the majority

of her life, working with the Aboriginal community in a variety of roles. More recently she has moved into the areas of Aboriginal Health and Aboriginal Health Promotion. Trudie commenced her role as a Research Assistant in Aboriginal Health at the University Department of Rural Health in April 2017.

 

Trudie is committed to helping make a difference to the health and well-being of the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander community in the region, for present and future generations. Trudie believes in culturally appropriate research in the support and development of strategies that enable service providers to work more confidently and effectively with Aboriginal clients.